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Measurement Webinar - "Data Linkage" featuring Kimberlyn McGrail, PhD (Scientific Director, Population Data BC) and Anne Gadermann, PhD (Assistant Professor, Human Early Learning Partnership, School of Population and Public Health). August 1, 2019, 11am-noon PT. REGISTER HERE.

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LCRN is actively seeking additional funding to develop new and innovative transdisciplinary research and activities. If you would like to contribute, please contact Jason Timmerman, Project Assistant, at jmtimmerman@mednet.ucla.edu.

Facilitating mechanisms for integrating care to promote health equity across the life course: reflections from social work trainees

By Rebecca Reno, Brieanne Beaujolais, Tamara S. Davis

Abstract   Integrated care is a promising practice to promote health equity and improve population health across the life course, but the mechanisms needed to integrate services remain nebulous. This study aimed to identify the components required to achieve a fully integrated health care system as articulated by social work trainees. The authors conducted five focus groups (N = 20). Transcripts were analyzed using structural and pattern coding. Three primary themes emerged: Organizational Structure and Support, Personal and Interpersonal Dynamics, and Practitioner Knowledge. Results from this study can inform the process of integration and has implications for social work education.   Access the Paper here  

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Trajectories of family poverty and children’s mental health: Results from the Danish National Birth Cohort

By Laura Pryor, Katrine Strandberg-Larsen, Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen, Naja Hulvej Rod, Maria Melchior

Abstract   Children exposed to socioeconomic adversity have elevated levels of psychological difficulties immediately and long-term. However, few studies have examined the consequences of long-term patterns of dynamic trajectories of family income. The Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) is a longitudinal, population-based birth cohort study (1996–2002). Data on household poverty from the year before birth until the child was 10 years of age (n=12 measures) were obtained from the National Danish Registries and modeled using semiparametric groupbased modeling. Child mental health symptoms were measured at 11 years using mother and child-reported Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaires (n=40 192), and the child-reported Stress in Childhood (SiC) scale (n=46 284). Four categories of …

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Discursive Paper – The Life Course Health Development Model: A theoretical research framework for paediatric delirium

By Laura Beth Kalvas

Abstract   Aims and objectives: To create a framework for future research through application and critique of the Life Course Health Development Model to the phenomenon of  paediatric delirium.   Conclusions: The Life Course Health Development Model depicts a process in which  the acute and severe stress of critical illness leads to maladaptive neurologic changes  that contribute to the development of delirium and impair a child’s life trajectory.   Relevance to clinical practice: By emphasising the potential lifelong consequences  for critically ill children who experience delirium, this application of the Life Course  Health Development Model will stimulate discussion, research and practice change among paediatric clinicians and researchers.   Access the Paper here  

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Issue Brief – Why Becoming a Good Parent Begins in Infancy: How Relationship Skills Are Developed throughout the Life Course

By Edward L. Schor

Abstract   Learning social skills is a cumulative, lifelong task, the consequences of which can influence subsequent generations. These skills, built on temperamental differences observable early in infancy, are manifest in all stages of life, and they can be taught and reinforced at all ages and in numerous social settings. Social skill acquisition is profoundly important in attaining personal satisfaction in relationships and achieving success in many spheres of life, including parenting.   Learning effective social skills is strongly influenced by the circumstances in which social development occurs. Professionals, who are uniquely positioned to observe and help shape relationship skills, have a special responsibility to be aware of those educational …

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How Socioeconomic Disadvantages Get Under the Skin and into the Brain to Influence Health Development Across the Lifespan

By Pilyoung Kim, Gary W. Evans, Edith Chen, Gregory Miller, and Teresa Seeman

This is one of 26 chapters published in the Handbook of Life Course Health Development.   Abstract: Socioeconomic disadvantage (SED) has adverse impacts on physical (Adler and Rehkopf 2008; Blair and Raver 2012; Braverman and Egerter 2008; Cohen et al. 2010; Poulton et al. 2002) and psychological (Adler and Rehkopf 2008; Bradley and Corwyn 2002; Grant et al. 2003) health development. SED is similar to low socioeconomic status (SES) which is based on occupation, income, and education or a composite of more than one of these indicators (McLoyd 1998). However, we conceptualize SED more broadly than socioeconomic status to also include subjective perception of social position and contextual indicators of disadvantage, …

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Self-Regulation

By Megan McClelland, John Geldhof, Fred Morrison, Steinunn Gestsdóttir, Claire Cameron, Ed Bowers, Angela Duckworth, Todd Little, and Jennie Grammer

This is one of 26 chapters published in the Handbook of Life Course Health Development.   Abstract: Self-regulation has been shown to have important implications for individual trajectories of health and well-being across the life course. The present chapter examines the development of self-regulation from a life course health development (LCHD) perspective. Using the seven principles of LCHD and the relational developmental systems (RDS) framework, the chapter focuses on the importance of self-regulation for health and well-being over time and across contexts and examines the pathways of self-regulation including the individual, contextual, and sociocultural factors that influence the development of these skills over time, methods for studying self-regulation, and translational issues. …

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Emerging Adulthood as a Critical Stage in the Life Course

By David Wood, Tara Crapnell, Lynette Lau, Ashley Bennett, Debra Lotstein, Maria Ferris. and Alice Kuo

This is one of 26 chapters published in the Handbook of Life Course Health Development.   Abstract: Emerging adulthood, viewed through the lens of life course health development, has the potential to be a very positive developmental stage with postindustrial societies giving adolescents and emerging adults a greater opportunity for choice and exploration but also greater challenges with greater educational and social role requirements. The loss of supports and structures offered by schools, families, and child- and family-oriented health and social services means that the emerging adult must rely more on his/her own resources in a less structured environment. This increased agency in the context of less structure is occurring as …

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Rethinking the role of stress in development: Emerging evolutionary perspectives

By Marco Del Giudice

This webinar – part of LCRN’s series on The State of Life Course Health Development Research – features Marco Del Giudice, PhD.   Dr. Del Giudice is Assistant Professor at the Department of Psychology at the University of New Mexico. His main research area is the evolutionary study of human development across the life span, with a focus on individual and sex differences and their neurobiological basis. He has published more than 60 papers and book chapters on a wide range of topics, from the biology of developmental plasticity to the classification of mental disorders in an evolutionary framework. With his collaborators he has advanced the Adaptive Calibration Model, an evolutionary-developmental model …

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The Parental Brain: How Parenthood Shapes the Adult Brain

By Pilyoung Kim

This webinar – part of the LCRN’s series on The State of Life Course Health Development Research: Past, Present and Future – features Pilyoung Kim, PhD.   Dr. Kim is Assistant Professor of Psychology and a director of the Family and Child Neuroscience lab at the University of Denver. Her long-term research career trajectory is to examine the early life origins of socioeconomic disparities in health from a neurobiological perspective. Dr. Kim’s current work, funded by the National Institue of Child Health and Human Development, focuses on the prospective effects of perinatal exposures to poverty on the neural plasticity in new mothers and infants. She was a recipient of the 2014 …

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How Socioeconomic Disadvantages Get Into the Brain Across the Lifespan

By Pilyoung Kim

This webinar, part of the LCRN’s series based on the Handbook of Life Course Health Development,  features Pilyoung Kim, PhD.   Dr. Kim is Assistant Professor of Psychology and Director of the Family and Child Neuroscience lab at the University of Denver (http://www.pilyoungkim.org/). Dr. Kim’s long-term research career trajectory is to examine the early life origins of socioeconomic disparities in health from a neurobiological perspective. Her current work focuses on the prospective effects of perinatal exposures to poverty-related chronic stress on the neural systems in new mothers and infants. Dr. Kim received her Master’s Degree from Harvard and her PhD from Cornell before completing a post-doctoral fellowship in Developmental Affective …

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